Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

How has written language changed over time? Do the way we read and the way our eyes work influence how scripts look? This week we hear a story on changes in legibility in written texts with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic.

 Sarah Crespi also interviews Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel on her story about detecting signs of psychosis in kids and teens, recruiting at-risk individuals for trials, and searching for anything that can stop the progression.

  Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: Procsilas Moscas/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Catherine Matacic; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171117.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories on what to do with experimental brain implants after a study is over,  how gene therapy gave a second skin to a boy with a rare epidermal disease, and how bone markings thought to be evidence for early hominid tool use may have been crocodile bites instead, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic.

 

Sarah Crespi interviews Gary King about his new experiment to bring fresh data to the age-old question of how the news media influences the public. Are journalists setting the agenda or following the crowd? How can you know if a news story makes a ripple in a sea of online information? In a powerful study, King’s group was able to publish randomized stories on 48 small and medium sized news sites in the United States and then track the results.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Chad Sparkes/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Catherine Matacic

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171110.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories on how the sloshing of Earth’s core may spike major earthquakes, carbon monoxide’s role in keeping deep diving elephant seals oxygenated, and a festival celebrating heavily researched yet completely nonsensical theories with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi interviews staff writer Jocelyn Kaiser about the status of gene therapy, including a newly tested gene-delivering virus that may give scientists a new way to treat devastating spinal and brain diseases.

 

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Robert Schwemmer, CINMS, NOAA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171103.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories on sunlight pushing Mars’s flock of asteroids around, approximately 400-million-year-old trees that grew by splitting their guts, and why fighting poverty might also mean worsening climate change with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 Sarah Crespi talks with cognitive neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene of the Collège de France in Paris about consciousness—what is it and can machines have it?

 For our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck reviews astronaut Scott Kelly’s book Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: NASA/Goddard; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171027.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

 This week we hear stories about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s (LIGO) latest hit, why wolves are better team players than dogs, and volcanic eruptions that may have triggered riots in ancient Egypt, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic.

Sarah Crespi interviews contrinbuting correspondent Lizzie Wade about the soon-to-open Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. Can it recover from early accusations of forgeries and illicitly obtained artifacts?

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: Public Domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171020.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories about a new brain imaging technique for newborns, recently uncovered evidence on rice domestication on three continents, and why Canada geese might be migrating into cities, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi interviews Sarah Tishkoff of University of Pennsylvania about the age and diversity of genes related to skin pigment in African genomes.

 

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[Image:Danny Chapman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171013.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories about putting rescue bots to the test after the Mexico earthquake, why a Scottish village was buried in sand during the Little Ice Age, and efforts by the U.S. military to predict post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Andrew Wagner interviews Alexandra Tinnermann of the University Medical Center of Hamburg, Germany, about the nocebo effect. Unlike the placebo effect, in which you get positive side effects with no treatment, in the nocebo effect you get negative side effects with no treatment. It turns out both nocebo and placebo effects get stronger with a drug perceived as more expensive.   

 

Read the research.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171006.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

 

This week we hear stories on how a bat varies its heart rate to avoid starving, giant wombatlike creatures that once migrated across Australia, and the downsides of bedbugs’ preference for dirty laundry with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks Jocelyn Kaiser about her guide to preprint servers for biologists—what they are, how they are used, and why some people are worried about preprint publishing’s rising popularity.

 

For our monthly book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to author Sandra Postel about her book, Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity.  

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: tap10/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170929.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories on animal hoarding, how different languages have different numbers of colors, and how to tell a wakeful jellyfish from a sleeping one with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic, Brice Russ, and Sarah Crespi.

 

Andrew Wagner talks to Karl-Heinz Kampert about a long-term study of the cosmic rays blasting our planet. After analyzing 30,000 high-energy rays, it turns out some are coming from outside the Milky Way.

 

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[Image: Doug Letterman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170922.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we hear stories on the gut microbiome’s involvement in multiple sclerosishow wildfires start—hint: It’s almost always people—and a new record in quantum computing with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Andrew Wagner talks to Lulu Qian about DNA-based robots that can carry and sort cargo.   

 

Sarah Crespi goes behind the scenes with Science’s Photography Managing Editor Bill Douthitt to learn about snapping this week’s cover photo of the world’s smallest neutrino detector.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Curtis Perry/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170915.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST