Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

This week we have stories on what the rogue Parkinson’s protein is doing in the gut, how chimps outmuscle humans, and evidence for an ancient skull cult with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Jen Golbeck is back with this month’s book segment. She interviews Alan Alda about his new book on science communication: If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Jeremy Kerr about two huge studies that take a nuanced looked at the relationship between pesticides and bees.

Read the research in Science:

Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees

B.A. Woodcock et al.

 

Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops

  1. Tsvetkov et al.

 

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[Image: webted/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

 

Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170630.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

 

This week we have stories on the new capabilities of science balloons, connections between deforestation and drug trafficking in Central America, and new insights into the role ancient Egypt had in taming cats with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Mary Caswell Stoddard about why bird eggs come in so many shapes and sizes.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image:; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170623.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:30pm EST

This week we have stories on why it’s taking so long for research chimps to retire, boosting melanin for a sun-free tan, and tracking a mouse trail to find liars online with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Allison Rubin about what we can learn from zircon crystals outside of a volcano about how long hot magma hangs out under a volcano.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image:Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170616.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we have stories on what body cams reveal about interactions between black drivers and U.S. police officers, the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils, and how modern astronomers measured the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein—with Online News Intern Ryan Cross.

 Sarah Crespi talks to Eyal Ben-David about a pair of selfish genes—one toxin and one antidote—that have been masquerading as essential developmental genes in a nematode worm. She asks how many more so-called “essential genes” are really just self-perpetuating freeloaders?

 Science Careers Editor Rachel Bernstein is also here to talk about stress and work-life balance for researchers and science students.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Ryan Cross; Rachel Bernstein

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170609.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

This week we have stories on how we taste water, extracting ancient DNA from mummy heads, and the earliest evidence for dog breeding with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to John Travis about postsurgical cognitive dysfunction—does surgery sap your brain power?

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170602.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

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