Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

In the wake of a devastating earthquake, assessing the extent of damage to infrastructure is time consuming—now, a cheap sensor system based on the accelerometers in cellphones could expedite this process. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about how these sensor systems work and how they might assist communities after an earthquake.

 

In another Earth-shaking study, scientists have downgraded the height of the ancient Tibetan Plateau. Most reconstructions estimate that the “rooftop of the world” reached its current height of 4500 meters about 40 million years ago, but a new study suggests it was a mere 3000 meters high during this period. Host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Svetlana Botsyun, a postdoctoral researcher at Tübingen University in Germany, about her team’s new approach to studying paleoelevation, and how a shorter Tibetan Plateau would have impacted the surrounding area’s climate.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Martin Luff/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

  

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Lizzie Wade, Meagan Cantwell

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190301.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

In our first segment from the AAAS annual meeting in Washington, D.C., host Sarah Crespi talks with Cathy Binger of University of New Mexico in Albuquerque about her session on the role of modern technology, such as iPads and apps, in helping people with communication disorders. It turns out that there’s no killer app, but some devices do help normalize assistive technology for kids.

 

Also this week, freelance journalist Sarah Scoles joins Sarah Crespi to talk about bringing together satellite imaging, machine learning, and nonprofits to put a stop to modern-day slavery.

 

In our monthly books segment, books editor Valerie Thompson talks with Judy Gisel about her book Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction, including discussions of Gisel’s personal experience with addiction and how it has informed her research as a neuroscientist.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: ILO in Asia and the Pacific/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Sarah Scoles; Valerie Thompson

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190222.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

The app on your phone tells you the weather for the next 10 days—that’s the furthest forecasters have ever been able to predict. In fact, every decade for the past hundred years, a day has been added to the total forecast length. But we may be approaching a limit—thanks to chaos inherent in the atmosphere. Staff writer Paul Voosen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how researchers have determined that we will only be adding about 4 more days to our weather prediction apps.

 

Also this week, host Meagan Cantwell interviews Trygve Fossum from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim about his article in Science Robotics on an underwater autonomous vehicle designed to sample phytoplankton off the coast of Norway. The device will help researchers form a better picture of the base of many food webs and with continued monitoring, researchers hope to better understand key processes in the ocean such as nutrient, carbon, and energy cycling.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; Paul Voosen

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190215.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

Because of its genetic complexity, the potato didn’t undergo a “green revolution” like other staple crops. It can take more than 15 years to breed a new kind of potato that farmers can grow, and genetic engineering just won’t work for tackling complex traits such as increased yield or heat resistance. Host Sarah Crespi talks with staff writer Erik Stokstad about how researchers are trying to simplify the potato genome to make it easier to manipulate through breeding.

 

Researchers and companies are racing to perfect an injector pill—a pill that you swallow, which then uses a tiny needle to shoot medicine into the body. Such an approach could help improve compliance for injected medications like insulin. Host Meagan Cantwell and staff writer Robert F. Service discuss a new kind of pill—one that flips itself over once it hits the bottom of the stomach and injects a dose of medication into the stomach lining.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Michael Eric Nickel/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; Erik Stokstad; Robert Service

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190208.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

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