Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Southern California’s famous Santa Anita racetrack is struggling to explain a series of recent horse injuries and deaths. Host Meagan Cantwell is joined by freelance journalist Christa Lesté-Lasserre to discuss what might be causing these injuries and when the track might reopen.

In our second segment, researchers are racing to understand the impact of jailing people before trial in the United States. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the negative downstream effects of cash bail—and what research can tell us about other options for the U.S. pretrial justice system.

Last up is books, in which we hear about the long, sometimes winding, roads that food can take from its source to your plate. Books editor Valerie Thompson talks with author Robyn Metcalfe about her new work, Food Routes: Growing Bananas in Iceland and Other Tales from the Logistics of Eating.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

*Correction, 1 April, 12 p.m.: A previous version of this podcast included an additional research technique that was not used to investigate the Santa Anita racetrack.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Mark Smith/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; Catherine Matacic; Christa Lesté-Lasserre

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190329.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

Pirate’s gold may not be that far off, as there are valuable metals embedded in potato-size nodules thousands of meters down in the depths of the ocean. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with Staff Writer Paul Voosen about the first deep-sea test of a bus-size machine designed to scoop up these nodules, and its potential impact on the surrounding ecosystem.

 

In an expedition well above sea level, the Hayabusa 2 spacecraft touched down on the asteroid Ryugu last month. And although the craft won’t return to Earth until 2020, researchers have learned a lot about Ryugu in the meantime. Meagan speaks with Seiji Sugita, a professor at the University of Tokyo and the principal investigator of the Optical Navigation Camera of Hayabusa 2, about Ryugu’s parent body, and how this study can better inform future asteroid missions.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image:  Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); Music: Jeffrey Cook]

  

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Authors: Meagan Cantwell, Paul Voosen

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190322.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

 

Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Daniel Clery about the many, many theories surrounding fast radio bursts—extremely fast, intense radio signals from outside the galaxy—and a new telescope coming online that may help sort them out.

Also this week, Sarah talks with Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel about her story on researchers’ attempts to tackle the long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment. The survival rate for some pediatric cancers is as high as 90%, but many survivors have a host of health problems. Jennifer’s feature is part of a special section on pediatric cancer.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: ESO/L. Calçada; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190315.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

New archaeological evidence suggests the same black plague that decimated Europe also took its toll on sub-Saharan Africa. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about diverse medieval sub-Saharan cities that shrank or even disappeared around the same time the plague was stalking Europe.

 

In a second archaeological story, Meagan Cantwell talks with Gustavo Politis, professor of archaeology at the National University of Central Buenos Aires and the National University of La Plata, about new radiocarbon dates for giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentine archaeological site Campo Laborde. The team’s new dates suggest humans hunted and butchered ground sloths in the late Pleistocene, about 12,500 years ago.

 

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Ife-Sungbo Archaeological Project; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Lizzie Wade, Meagan Cantwell

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190308.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

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