Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Researchers have been making animal embryos from two different species, so-called “chimeras,” for years, by introducing stem cells from one species into a very early embryo of another species. The ultimate goal is to coax the foreign cells into forming an organ for transplantation. But questions abound: Can evolutionarily distant animals, like pigs and humans, be mixed together to produce such organs? Or could species closely related to us, like chimps and marques, stand in for tests with human cells? Staff writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to [discuss the research, the regulations, and the growing ethical debate-linkTK].

 

Also this week, Sarah talks with Yossi Yovel of the School of Zoology and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University about his work on sensory integration in bats. Writing in Science Advances, he and his colleagues show through several clever experiments when bats switch between echolocation and vision. Yossi and Sarah discuss how these tradeoffs in bats can inform larger questions about our own perception.   

 

For our monthly books segment, Science books editor Valerie Thompson talks with Lucy Jones of the Seismological Laboratory of Caltech about a song she created, based on 130 years of temperature data, for an instrument called the “viola de gamba.” Read more on the Books et al. blog.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: The Legend Kay/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kelly Servick

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190628.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

How can you resist puppy dog eyes? This sweet, soulful look might very well have been bred into canines by their intended victims—humans. Online News Editor David Grimm talks with host Meagan Cantwell about a new study on the evolution of this endearing facial maneuver. David also talks about what diseased dog spines can tell us about early domestication—were these marks of hard work or a gentler old age for our doggy domestics?

 

Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Michel Marechal of the University of Zurich in Switzerland about honesty around the globe. By tracking about 17,000 wallets left at hotels, post offices, and banks, his team found that we humans are a lot more honest than either economic models or our own intuitions give us credit for.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on the show: MagellanTV

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Molly Marshall/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi;  Meagan Cantwell; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190621.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

We’ve all seen images or animations of hurricanes that color code the wind speeds inside the whirling mass—but it turns out we can do a better job measuring these winds and, as a result, better predict the path of the storm. Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how a microsatellite-based project for measuring hurricane wind speeds is showing signs of success—despite unexpected obstacles from the U.S. military’s tweaking of GPS signals.   

 

Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Samantha Trumbo, a Ph.D. candidate in planetary science at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, about spotting chloride salts on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. What can these salts on the surface tell us about the oceans that lie beneath Europa’s icy crust?

 

 This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on the show: KiwiCo.com; MagellanTV

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Paul Voosen

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190614.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Cheap and easy to make, perovskite minerals have become the wonder material of solar energy. Now, scientists are turning from using perovskites to capture light to using them to emit it. Staff Writer Robert Service joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about using these minerals in all kinds of LEDs, from cellphones to flat screen TVs.

 

Read the related paper in Science Advances.

 

Also this week, Sarah talks with Caitlin Thurber, a biologist at Nassau Community College in Garden City, New York, about a hard limit on human endurance. Her group used data from transcontinental racers—who ran 957 kilometers over the course of 20 weeks—and found that after about 100 days, their metabolism settled in at about 2.5 times the baseline rate, suggesting a hard limit on human endurance at long timescales. Earlier studies based on the 23-day Tour de France found much higher levels of energy expenditure, in the four- to five- times-baseline range.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on the show: KiwiCo.com

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: N. Zhou et al., Science Advances 2019; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Robert Service

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190607.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

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