Science Magazine Podcast (Science)
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

This week we hear stories on how the sloshing of Earth’s core may spike major earthquakes, carbon monoxide’s role in keeping deep diving elephant seals oxygenated, and a festival celebrating heavily researched yet completely nonsensical theories with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi interviews staff writer Jocelyn Kaiser about the status of gene therapy, including a newly tested gene-delivering virus that may give scientists a new way to treat devastating spinal and brain diseases.

 

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Robert Schwemmer, CINMS, NOAA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171103.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on sunlight pushing Mars’s flock of asteroids around, approximately 400-million-year-old trees that grew by splitting their guts, and why fighting poverty might also mean worsening climate change with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 Sarah Crespi talks with cognitive neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene of the Collège de France in Paris about consciousness—what is it and can machines have it?

 For our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck reviews astronaut Scott Kelly’s book Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: NASA/Goddard; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171027.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

 This week we hear stories about the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s (LIGO) latest hit, why wolves are better team players than dogs, and volcanic eruptions that may have triggered riots in ancient Egypt, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic.

Sarah Crespi interviews contrinbuting correspondent Lizzie Wade about the soon-to-open Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. Can it recover from early accusations of forgeries and illicitly obtained artifacts?

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: Public Domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171020.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories about a new brain imaging technique for newborns, recently uncovered evidence on rice domestication on three continents, and why Canada geese might be migrating into cities, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi interviews Sarah Tishkoff of University of Pennsylvania about the age and diversity of genes related to skin pigment in African genomes.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image:Danny Chapman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171013.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories about putting rescue bots to the test after the Mexico earthquake, why a Scottish village was buried in sand during the Little Ice Age, and efforts by the U.S. military to predict post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Andrew Wagner interviews Alexandra Tinnermann of the University Medical Center of Hamburg, Germany, about the nocebo effect. Unlike the placebo effect, in which you get positive side effects with no treatment, in the nocebo effect you get negative side effects with no treatment. It turns out both nocebo and placebo effects get stronger with a drug perceived as more expensive.   

 

Read the research.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_171006.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

 

This week we hear stories on how a bat varies its heart rate to avoid starving, giant wombatlike creatures that once migrated across Australia, and the downsides of bedbugs’ preference for dirty laundry with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks Jocelyn Kaiser about her guide to preprint servers for biologists—what they are, how they are used, and why some people are worried about preprint publishing’s rising popularity.

 

For our monthly book segment, Jen Golbeck talks to author Sandra Postel about her book, Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity.  

 

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[Image: tap10/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170929.mp3
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This week we hear stories on animal hoarding, how different languages have different numbers of colors, and how to tell a wakeful jellyfish from a sleeping one with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic, Brice Russ, and Sarah Crespi.

 

Andrew Wagner talks to Karl-Heinz Kampert about a long-term study of the cosmic rays blasting our planet. After analyzing 30,000 high-energy rays, it turns out some are coming from outside the Milky Way.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Doug Letterman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170922.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on the gut microbiome’s involvement in multiple sclerosishow wildfires start—hint: It’s almost always people—and a new record in quantum computing with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Andrew Wagner talks to Lulu Qian about DNA-based robots that can carry and sort cargo.   

 

Sarah Crespi goes behind the scenes with Science’s Photography Managing Editor Bill Douthitt to learn about snapping this week’s cover photo of the world’s smallest neutrino detector.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Curtis Perry/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170915.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on smooth sailing with giant silo-like sails, a midsized black hole that may be hiding out in the Milky Way, and new water-cooling solar panels that could cut air-conditioning costs—with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Sabrina McCormick about climate science in the US courts and the growing role of the judiciary in climate science policy

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170908.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on involving more AIs in negotiations[link tK], tiny algae that might be responsible for killing some (not all) dinosaurs, and a chemical intended to make farm fish grow faster that may be also be causing one area’s crocodile population to skew male—with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Rich Stone about being on the scene for a joint U.S.-China mission to remove bomb-grade fuel from a nuclear reactor in Ghana.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image:Chad Sparkes; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170901.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Sarah Crespi talks to Sam Smits about how our microbial passengers differ from one culture to the next—are we losing diversity and the ability to fight chronic disease?

 

For our books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Vyvyan Evans about his book The Emoji Code: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Woodlouse/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Jen Golbeck; 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170825.mp3
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This week we hear stories on a big jump in U.S. rates of knee arthritis, some science hits and misses from past eclipse, and the link between a recently discovered thousand-year-old Viking fortress and your Bluetooth earbuds with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Daniel Apai about a long-term study of brown dwarfs and what patterns in the atmospheres of these not-quite-stars, not-quite-planets can tell us.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170818.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on new satellite measurements that suggest the Amazon makes its own rain for part of the year, puppies raised with less smothering moms do better in guide dog school, and what DNA can tell us about ancient Greeks’ near mythical origins with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Lizzie Wade about coastal and underwater evidence of a watery route for the Americas’ first people. 

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Lizzie Wade; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm;  Lizzie Wade

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170811.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease in chimps, a potential new pathway to diabetes—through prions—and what a database of industrial espionage says about the economics of spying with Online News Editors David Grimm and Catherine Matacic.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Innes Cuthill about how the biology of color intersects with behavior, development, and vision. And, Mary Soon Lee joins to share some of her chemistry haiku—one poem for each element in the periodic table.

 

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Zoltan Tasi/Unsplash; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170804.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we hear stories on turning data sets into symphonies for business and pleasure, why so much of the world is stuck in the poverty trap, and calls for stiffening statistical significance with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to news writer Ann Gibbons about the biology of ancient books—what can we learn from DNA, proteins, and book worm trails about a book, its scribes, and its readers?

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170728.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on the genes that may make dogs friendly,

why midsized animals are the fastest, and what it would take to destroy all the life on our planet with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Seema Jayachandran about paying cash to Ugandan farmers to not cut down trees—does it reduce deforestation in the long term?

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Kerrick/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170721.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we have stories on how ultraviolet rays may have jump-started the first enzymes on Earth, a new fossil find that helps date how quickly birds diversified after the extinction of all the other dinosaurs, and a drug that may help reverse the effects of traumatic brain injury on memory with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic and special guest Carolyn Gramling.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Christian Catalini about an experiment in which some early adopters were denied access to new technology and what it means for the dissemination of that tech.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Michael Wuensch/Creative Commons Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Catherine Matacic; Carolyn Gramling

Direct download: SciencePodcast_20170714.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on the twisty tree of human ancestry, why mice shed weight when they can’t smell, and the damaging effects of even a small amount of oil on a bird’s feathers—with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about a special section on how artificial intelligence is changing the way we do science.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image:; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_2017_07_07.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on what the rogue Parkinson’s protein is doing in the gut, how chimps outmuscle humans, and evidence for an ancient skull cult with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Jen Golbeck is back with this month’s book segment. She interviews Alan Alda about his new book on science communication: If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Jeremy Kerr about two huge studies that take a nuanced looked at the relationship between pesticides and bees.

Read the research in Science:

Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees

B.A. Woodcock et al.

 

Chronic exposure to neonicotinoids reduces honey bee health near corn crops

  1. Tsvetkov et al.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: webted/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

 

Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170630.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

 

This week we have stories on the new capabilities of science balloons, connections between deforestation and drug trafficking in Central America, and new insights into the role ancient Egypt had in taming cats with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Mary Caswell Stoddard about why bird eggs come in so many shapes and sizes.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image:; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170623.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:30pm EDT

This week we have stories on why it’s taking so long for research chimps to retire, boosting melanin for a sun-free tan, and tracking a mouse trail to find liars online with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to Allison Rubin about what we can learn from zircon crystals outside of a volcano about how long hot magma hangs out under a volcano.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image:Project Chimps; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170616.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on what body cams reveal about interactions between black drivers and U.S. police officers, the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils, and how modern astronomers measured the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein—with Online News Intern Ryan Cross.

 Sarah Crespi talks to Eyal Ben-David about a pair of selfish genes—one toxin and one antidote—that have been masquerading as essential developmental genes in a nematode worm. She asks how many more so-called “essential genes” are really just self-perpetuating freeloaders?

 Science Careers Editor Rachel Bernstein is also here to talk about stress and work-life balance for researchers and science students.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

  [Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Ryan Cross; Rachel Bernstein

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170609.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on how we taste water, extracting ancient DNA from mummy heads, and the earliest evidence for dog breeding with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Sarah Crespi talks to John Travis about postsurgical cognitive dysfunction—does surgery sap your brain power?

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170602.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not so distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first data from the Juno mission, including what Jupiter’s poles look like and a peak under its outer cloud layers.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

 

[Copyright Silverback Films/BBC: TK; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170526.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on blocking dangerous or annoying distractions in augmented reality, gene therapy applied with ultrasound to heal bone breaks, and giving robots geckolike gripping power with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Deputy News Editor Elizabeth Culotta joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a special package on human migrations—from the ancient origins of Europeans to the restless and wandering scientists of today.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170519.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we have stories on ancient hominids that may have coexisted with early modern humans, methane seeps in the Arctic that could slow global warming, and understanding color without words with Online News Intern Lindzi Wessel.

 

John McGann joins Sarah Crespi to discuss long-standing myths about our ability to smell. It turns out people are probably a lot better at detecting odors than scientists thought!

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

 

[Image:  Streluk/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170512.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we discuss the most accurate digital model of a human face to date, stray Wi-Fi signals that can be used to spy on a closed room, and artificial intelligence that can predict Supreme Court decisions with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic.

 

Caroline Hartley joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a scan that can detect pain in babies—a useful tool when they can’t tell you whether something really hurts.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170505.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Podcast: Where dog breeds come from, bots that build buildings, and gathering ancient human DNA from cave sediments

 

On this week’s show: Finding ancient people without fossils and a roundup from the daily news site

 

This week, a new family tree of dog breeds, advances in artificial wombs, and an autonomous robot that can print a building with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Viviane Slon joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a new way to seek out ancient humans—without finding fossils or bones—by screening sediments for ancient DNA.

 

Jen Golbeck interviews Andrew Schulman, author of Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong for this month’s book segment. 

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

See more book segments.

 

 

[Image: nimis69/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, meteors’ hiss may come from radio waves, pigeons that build on the wings of those that came before, and a potential answer to the century-old mystery of what turned two lions into people eaters with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Elise Amel joins Julia Rosen to discuss the role of evolution and psychology in humans’ ability to overcome norms and change the world, as part of a special issue on conservation in this week’s Science Magazine.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: bjdlzx/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170421.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, walk like an elephant—very far, with seeds in your guts, Cassini’s mission to Saturn wraps up with news on the habitability of its icy moon Enceladus, and how our shoes manage to untie themselves with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 Aylin Caliskan joins Sarah Crespi to discuss how biases in our writing may be perpetuated by the machines that learn from them.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170414.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, viruses as remnants of a fourth domain of life, a scan of many Tibetan genomes reveals seven new genes potentially related to high-altitude life, and doubts about dark energy with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Danielle Li joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study quantifying the impact of government funding on innovation by linking patents to U.S. National Institutes of Health grants.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

 

[Image: TK; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170407.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, new estimates for the depths of the world’s lakes, a video game that could help kids be safer bike riders, and teaching autonomous cars to read road signs with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Ariana Orvell joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study of how the word “you” is used when people recount meaningful experiences.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: TK; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170324.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170317.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, how Flickr photos could help predict floods, why it might be a good idea to ignore some cyberattacks, and new questions about the existence of human pheromones with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Sarah Richardson joins Alexa Billow to discuss a global project to build a set of working yeast chromosomes from the ground up.

 

Read Sarah Richardson’s research in Science.  

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Drew Gurian; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170310.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about the science behind breaking the 2-hour marathon barrier, storing data in DNA strands, and a dinosaur’s zigzagging backbones with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. And Carolina Levis joins Alexa Billow to discuss evidence that humans have been domesticating the Amazon’s plants a lot longer than previously thought.

 

Read Carolina Levis’s research in Science.  

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Carolina Levis; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170303.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about why people are nice to each other—does it feel good or are we just avoiding feeling bad—approaches to keeping arsenic out of the food supply, and using artificial intelligence to figure out what a chemical smells like to a human nose with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Stephen Brusatte joins Alexa Billow to discuss why dinosaurs evolved wings and feathers before they ever flew. And in the latest installment of our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Bill Schutt, author of Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Todd Marshall; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170224.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about what it means if a monkey can learn to recognize itself in a mirror, injecting people with live malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and insect-inspired wind turbines with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Joleah Lamb joins Alexa Billow to discuss how seagrass can greatly reduce harmful microbes in the ocean—protecting people and corals from disease. Read the research.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: peters99/iStock; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast170217.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about how the Earth is sending oxygen to the moon, using a GPS data set to hunt for dark matter, and retrieving 80-million year old proteins from dinosaur bones, with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Philip Tetlock joins Alexa Billow to discuss improving our ability to make judgments about the future through forecasting competitions as part of a special section on prediction in this week’s issue of Science

[Image: NASA; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Alexa Billow; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170203.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about 50-kilogram otters that once stalked southern China, using baseball stats to show how jet lag puts players off their game, and a growing link between pollution and dementia, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Also in this week’s show: our very first monthly book segment. In the inaugural segment, Jen Golbeck interviews Helen Pilcher about her new book Bring Back the King: The New Science of De-extinction. Plus Denise Tieman joins Alexa Billow to discuss the genes behind tomato flavor, or lack thereof.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

  

[Image: Dutodom; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170127.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about a surprising reason why killer whales undergo menopause, flipping a kill switch in mice with lasers, and Fukushima residents who measured their own radiation exposure[link tk], with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Stephen Elledge about the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities in tumors and immunotherapy for cancer.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Copyright Kenneth Balcomb Center for Whale Research; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170120.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about a blood test that could predict recovery time after a concussion, new insights into the bizarre hagfish’s anatomy, and a cheap paper centrifuge based on a toy, with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Christian Koerner about why just planting any old tree isn’t the answer to our carbon problem

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170113.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about how long dinosaur eggs take—or took—to hatch, a new survey that confirms the world’s hot spots for lightning, and replenishing endangered species with feral pets with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Megan Gannon about the dilemma presented by tissue samples collected during the Nazi era. And Sarah Crespi discusses a new test for mad cow disease with Kelly Servick.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: NASA/flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_170106.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about human evolution in action, 6000-year-old fairy tales, and other top news stories from 2016 with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to News Editor Tim Appenzeller about this year’s breakthrough, runners-up, breakdowns, and how Science’s predictions from last year help us. In a bonus segment, Science book review editor Valerie Thompson talks about the big science books of 2016 and science books for kids.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Warwick Goble; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 161223_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about what talking monkeys would sound like, a surprising virus detected in ancient pottery, and six cloned horses that helped win a big polo match with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Lizzie Wade about what forensic anthropologists can do to help parent groups find missing family members in Mexico.

 

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[Image: (c) Félix Márquez; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161216.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about kissing communication in ants, building immune strength by climbing the social ladder, and a registry for animal research with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Bjorn Emonts about the birth of stars in the Spiderweb Galaxy 10 billion years ago.

 

Related research on immune function and social hierarchy.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Lauren Brent; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161202.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 12:00pm EDT

 This week, we chat about cement’s shrinking carbon footprint, commuting hazards for ancient Egyptian artisans, and a new bipartisan group opposed to government-funded animal research in the United States with Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to news writer Sam Kean about the kinds of data that can only be gathered at night as part of the special issue on circadian biology.

 Listen to previous podcasts.

 [Image: roomauction/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161125.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week we chat about why it’s hard to get a taxi to nowhere, why bones came onto the scene some 550 million years ago, and how targeting bacteria’s predilection for iron might make better vaccines, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks with news writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the way hybrids muck up the concept of species and turn the evolutionary tree into a tangled web.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

[Image:  Raul González Alegría; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161118.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—is Bhutan really a quake-free zone, how much of scientific success is due to luck, and what farming changed about dogs and us—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Katelyn Gostic of the University of California, Los Angeles, about how the first flu you came down with—which depends on your birth year—may help predict your susceptibility to new flu strains down the road.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

 

[Image:monkeybusinessimages/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161111.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, news writer Greg Miller chats with us about how the legalization of marijuana in certain U.S. states is having an impact on the nation’s opioid problem. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Sascha Drewlo about a new method for profiling the DNA of fetuses very early on in pregnancy.

 

[Image: OpenRangeStock/iStockphoto/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Alexa Billow

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161104.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—eating rats in the Neolithic, growing evidence for a gargantuan 9th planet in our solar system, and how to keep just the good parts of a hookworm infection—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Maria Zuber about NASA’s GRAIL spacecraft, which makes incredibly precise measurements of the moon’s gravity. This week’s guest used GRAIL data to explore a giant impact crater and learn more about the effects of giant impacts on the moon and Earth.

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

[Image: Ernest Wright, NASA/GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: sciencepodcast_161028.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—jumping spiders that can hear without ears, long-lasting changes in the human body at high altitudes, and the long hunt for an extinct bison—with Science’s Online News Intern Jessica Boddy. Plus, Sarah Crespi talks to Deputy News Editor David Malakoff about six science lessons for the next U.S. president. 

 

[Image: Gil Menda at the Hoy Lab; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161021.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories -- including a new bacterial model for alien life that feeds on cosmic rays, tracking extinct “bear dogs” to Texas, and when we stop caring about plane crashes -- with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Alexa Billow talks to Staff Writer Kelly Servick about her feature story on the releasing modified mosquitoes in Brazil to combat diseases like Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Her story is part of a package on mosquito control. 

Listen to previous podcasts

 [Image: © Alex Wild; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161014.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week, we chat about some of our favorite stories—including making bees optimistic, comparing yawns across species, and “mind reading” in nonhuman apes—with Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Mercedes Paredes about her research on the developing infant brain.

 

Listen to previous podcasts

 

[Image: mdmiller/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_161007.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Daily news stories

Should we bring animals back from extinction, three-parent baby announced, and the roots of human violence, with David Grimm.

 

From the magazine

Our networked world gives us an unprecedented ability to monitor and respond to global happenings. Databases monitoring news stories can provide real-time information about events all over the world -- like conflicts or protests. However, the databases that now exist aren’t up to the task. Alexa Billow talks with Ryan Kennedy about his policy forum that addresses problems with global data collection and interpretation.

 

[Image: Stocktrek Images, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160930.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Daily news stories

A quick change in chickens’ genes due to a papal ban on eating four-legged animals, the appeal of tragedy, and genetic defects in the “sixth sense,” with David Grimm.

 

From the magazine

In February of this year, one of the most regular phenomena in the atmosphere skipped a cycle. Every 22 to 36 months, descending eastward and westward wind jets—high above the equator—switch places. The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, or QBO, is normally so regular you can almost set your watch by it, but not this year. Scott Osprey discusses the implications for this change with Alexa Billow.

 Read the research.

 

[Image: ValerijaP/iStockphoto/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160923.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on our earliest hunting companions, should we seed exoplanets with life, and finding space storm hot spots with David Grimm.

 From the magazine

Two years ago, 43 students disappeared from a teacher’s college in Guerrero, Mexico. Months of protests and investigation have not yielded a believable account of what happened to them. The government of Mexico claims that the students were killed by cartel members and burned on an outdoor pyre in a dump outside Cucola. Lizzie Wade has been following this story with a focus on the science of fire investigation. She talks about an investigator in Australia that has burned pig carcasses in an effort to understand these events in Mexico.

 

[Image: Edgard Garrido/REUTERS/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160916.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on magnetic waste in the brain, the top deal breakers in online dating, and wolves that are willing to “risk it for the biscuit,” with David Grimm.

 

From the magazine

How do we track where we are going and where we have been? Do you pay attention to your path? Look for landmarks? Leave a scent trail? The problem of navigation has been solved a number of different ways by animals. The desert-dwelling Cataglyphis ant was thought to rely on stride integration, basically counting their steps. But it turns out they have a separate method of keeping track of their whereabouts called “optic flow.” Matthias Wittlinger joins Sarah Crespi to talk about his work with these amazing creatures.

 

Read the research.

 

[Image: Rooobert Bayer /Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160909.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on what words dogs know, an RNA therapy for psoriasis, and how Lucy may have fallen from the sky, with Catherine Matacic.

 From the magazine

In early 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. Over the last year and a half, scientists have studied the mysterious dwarf planet using data collected by Dawn, including detailed images of its surface. Julia Rosen talks with Debra Buczkowski about Ceres’s close-up.

 See the full Ceres package.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160902.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Sarah Crespi takes a pop quiz on literal life hacking, spotting poverty from outer space, and the size of the average American vocabulary with Catherine Matacic.

 

From the magazine

You can already buy a quantum dot television, but it’s really just the beginning of the infiltration of quantum dots into our everyday lives. Cherie Kagan is here to talk about her in depth review of the technology published in this week’s issue.

 

[Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160826_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on a humanmade RNA copier that bolsters ideas about early life on Earth, the downfall of a pre-Columbian empire, and how a bit of cash at the right time can keep you off the streets, with Jessica Boddy.

 

From the magazine

This story combines two things we seem to talk about a lot on the podcast: reproducibility and the microbiome. The big question we’re going to take on is how reproducible are mouse studies when their microbiomes aren’t taken into account? Staff writer Kelly Servick is here to talk about what promises to be a long battle with mouse-dwelling bugs.

 

[Image: Annedde/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160819_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on using pets in clinical trials to test veterinarian drugs, debunking the Piltdown Man once and for all, and deciding just how smart crows can be, with David Grimm.

 

From the magazine

It’s really difficult to figure out how old a free-living animal is. Maybe you can find growth rings in bone or other calcified body parts, but in sharks like the Greenland shark, no such hardened parts exist. Using two different radiocarbon dating approaches, Julius Neilsen and colleagues discovered that the giant Greenland shark may live as long as 400 years.

 

Read the research.

 

[Image: James Howard McGregor/Wikimedia Commons/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160812.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News stories on bees that live perilously close to the mouth of a volcano, diagnosing arthritis in dinosaur bones, and the evolution of the female orgasm, with David Grimm.

 From the magazine

Rivers deliver water to the ocean but water is also discharged along the coast in a much more diffuse way. This “submarine groundwater discharge” carries dissolved chemicals out to sea. But the underground nature of these outflows makes them difficult to quantify.  Audrey Sawyer talks with Sarah Crespi about the scale of this discharge and how it affects coastal waters surrounding the United States.

 [Image: Hilary Erenler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160805_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Stories on birds that guide people to honey, genes left over from the last universal common ancestor, and what the nose knows about antibiotics, with Devi Shastri.

 The Endangered Species Act—a 1973 U.S. law designed to protect animals in the country from extinction—may need a fresh look. The focus on “species” is the problem. This has become especially clear when it comes to wolves—recent genetic information has led to government agencies moving to delist the grey wolf. Robert Wayne helps untangle the wolf family tree and talks us through how a better understanding of wolf genetics may trouble their protected status.

 [Image: Claire N. Spottiswoode/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160729_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic.

 

Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.

 

 

[Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160722_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

What do we know about humanity-ending catastrophes? Julia Rosen talks with Sarah Crespi about various doomsday scenarios and what science can do to save us.

Alex Kacelnik talks about getting ducklings to recognize “same” and “different”—a striking finding that reveals conceptual thinking in very early life.

 Read the related research.

[Image: Antone Martinho/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160715.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.

 [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160708.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on how plants know when to take risks, confirmation that the ozone layer is on the mend, and genes that come alive after death, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Science news writer Jon Cohen talks with Julia Rosen about South Africa’s bid to end AIDS.

 

[Image: J.Seita/Flickr/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160701.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with online news editor Catherine Matacic.

 

Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Siegfried Klaus/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160624.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.

 

Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160617.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.

 

Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160610_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on new evidence for double dog domestication, what traces of mercury in coral can tell us about local wars, and an update to a classic adaptation story, with online news editor David Grimm.

 

Brendan Colón talks about a bionic leaf system that captures light and carbon and converts it to several different types of fuels with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Andy Phillips/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160603.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on underground rings built by Neandertals, worldwide increases in cephalopods and a controversial hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Glen Weyl joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss academics’ role in rising markets that depend on data and networks of people. We’re lucky to live in the age of the match—need a ride, a song, a husband? There’s an app that can match your needs to the object of your desire, with some margin of error. But much of this innovation is happening in the private sector—what is academia doing to contribute?

 

[Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Etienne Fabre / SSAC]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160527.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on finding clues to giraffes’ height in their genomes, evidence that humans are still evolving from massive genome projects, and studies that infect humans with diseases on purpose.

 Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an intense study of slum-dwelling rats.

[Image: Mauricio Susin]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160520.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories how the Venus flytrap turned to the meat-eating side, a new clingy polymer film that shrinks up eye bags, and survey results on who pirates scientific papers and why.

 

Hanika Rizo joins Julia Rosen to discuss evidence that parts of Earth have remained unchanged since the planet formed.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160513.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on a proposal for an orca sanctuary in the sea, the genes behind conceiving fraternal twins, and why CRISPR won’t be fixing the sick anytime soon.

 

Elizabeth Pennisi joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss bold birds, shy spiders, and the importance of animal personality.

 

[Image: Judy Gallagher]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160506.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on how earthquakes may trigger volcanic eruptions, growing obesity in China’s children, and turning salty water sweet on the cheap.

 

Lauren Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the rise of patent trolls in the United States and a proposal for cutting back on their sizable profits.  

 

[Image: © Alberto Garcia/Corbis]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160429.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on a possibledebunking of a popular brain stimulation technique, using “dirty” mice in the lab to simulate the human immune system, and how South American monkeys’ earliest ancestors used rafts to get to Central America.

 

Kristi Curry Rogers joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss insights into dinosaur growth patterns from the bones of a baby titanosaur found in Madagascar.  Read the research.

 

[Image: K. Curry Rogers et al./Science]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160422.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online news editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on the evolution of sign language, short conversations than can change minds on social issues, and finding the one-in-a-million people who seem to be resistant to certain genetic diseases—even if they carry genes for them.

 

Nuno Faria joins host Sarah Crespi to explain how genomic analysis can track Zika’s entry date into Brazil and follow its spread.  

 

[Image: r.a. olea/Flickr]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160415.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on evidence for the earth being hit by supernovae, record-breaking xenotransplantation, and winning friends and influencing people with human sacrifice.

 

Staff news writer Jocelyn Kaiser joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how small membrane-bound packets called “exosomes” might pave the way for cancer cells to move into new territory in the body.  

 

[Image: Val Altounian/Science]

 

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160408.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on yeasty hitchhikers, sunlight-induced rockfalls, and the tiniest gravity sensor.

 

Andrea Adamo joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a revolutionary way of making drugs using a portable, on-demand, and reconfigurable drug factory.  

 

[Image: Tom Evans]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160401.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on SeaWorld’s plans for killer whales, the first steps toward silicon-based life, and the ripple effect of old dads on multiple generations.

 

Andrew Curry joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a grisly find in Northern Germany that suggests Bronze Age northern Europe was more organized and more violent than thought.

 

[Image: ANDESAMT FÜR KULTUR UND DENKMALPFLEGE MECKLENBURG-VORPOMMERN/LANDESARCHÄOLOGIE/S. SUHR ]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160325.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

News intern Nala Rogers shares stories on mineral-mining microbes, mapping hurricane damage using social media, and the big takeaway from the latest human-versus-computer match up.

 

Hal Weaver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss five papers from New Horizons Pluto flyby, including a special focus on Pluto’s smaller moons.

 

[Image: Saran_Poroong/iStockphoto]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160318.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on the influence of governmental corruption on the honesty of individuals, what happened when our ancestors cut back on the amount of time spent chewing food, and how plants use sand to grind herbivores‘ gears.

 

Science’s International News Editor Rich Stone joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his forensics story on how to track down the culprits after a nuclear detonation.

 

[Image: Miroslav Boskov]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160311.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on zombification by a frog-killing fungus, relating the cosmological constant to life in the universe, and ancient viral genes that protect us from illness.

 

Chris Larson joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new type of robot skin that can stretch and glow.

 

[Image: Jungbae Park]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160304.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online News Editor Catherine Matacic shares stories on what we can learn from 6million years of climate data, how to make lifelike orchids with 3D printing, and crowdsourced gender bias on eBay.

 

Fernando Rosario-Ortiz joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how approaches to water purification differ between countries.

 

[Image: Eric Hunt/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0]

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Direct download: SciencePodcast_160226.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on how our abilities shape our minds, killing cancer cells with gold nanoparticles, and catching art forgery with cat hair.

 

Laura Blanton joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how nourishing our gut microbes may prevent malnutrition. Read the related research in Science.

 

[Image: D. S. Wagner et al.Biomaterials, 31 (2010)]

 

Authors: Sarah Crespi; David Grimm

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160219.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on confessions extracted from sleepy people, malaria hiding out in deer, and making squishable bots based on cockroaches.

 

Corinne Simonti joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss whether Neandertal DNA in the human genome is helping or hurting. Read the related research in Science.

 

[Image: Tom Libby, Kaushik Jayaram and Pauline Jennings. Courtesy of PolyPEDAL Lab UC Berkeley.]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160212.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on killing cells to lengthen life, getting mom’s microbes after a C-section, and an advanced fitness tracker that sits on the wrist and sips sweat.

 

Michael Yudell joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an initiative to replace race in genetics with more biologically meaningful terms, and Lena Wilfert talks about drivers of the global spread of the bee-killing deformed wing virus.

 

[Image: Vipin Baliga/(CC BY 2.0)]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160205.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on 66-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex tracks, a signature of human consciousness, and a second try at domesticating cats. Mathieu Ossendrijver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss newly translated Babylonian tablets that extend the roots of calculus all the way back to between 350 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E. Read the related research in Science.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160129.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on studying marijuana use in teenage twins, building a better maze for psychological experiments, and a close inspection of the bugs in our homes. Science News Writer Eric Hand joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the potential for a ninth planet in the solar system that circles the sun just once every 15,000 years.   [Image: Gilles San Martin/CC BY-SA 2.0]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160122.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

In this week’s podcast, David Grimm talks about brave birds, building a brighter light bulb, and changing our voice to influence our emotions. Plus, Ann Gibbons discusses the implications of a butchered 45,000-year-old mammoth found in the Siberian arctic for human migration. Read the related research in Science. [IMG: Dmitry Bogdanov]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160115.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Emily Underwood wades into the muddled world of migraine research, Jessica Metcalf uses modern microbial means to track mammalian decomposition, and David Grimm brings stories from the daily news site on dino dancing, changing ant roles, and naked black holes. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image: David Bonazzi/@salzmanart]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160108.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

The Science breakthrough of the year, readers' choice, and the top news from 2015.

Robert Coontz discusses Science's 2015 Breakthrough of the Year and runners-up, from visions of Pluto to the discovery of a previously unknown human species. Online news editor David Grimm reviews the top news stories of the past year with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard.

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151218.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Artificial intelligence programs that learn concepts based on just a few examples and a daily news roundup

Brenden Lake discusses a new computational model that rivals the human ability to learn new concepts based on just a single example; David Grimm talks about attracting cockroaches, searching for habitable planets, and looking to street dogs to learn about domestication. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Rodrigo Basaure CC BY 2.0, via flickr]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151211.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

How our gut microbiota change as we age and a daily news roundup

Paul O'Toole discusses what happens to our gut microbes as we age; David Grimm talks about competent grandmas, our tilted moon, and gender in the brain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Dhinakaran Gajavarathan CC BY 2.0, via flickr]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151204.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Joshua Blumenstock discusses patterns of mobile phone use as a source of "big data" about wealth and poverty in developing countries; David Grimm talks about gene drives, helpful parasites, and electric roses. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: A.A. JAMES]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151127.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Bioengineering functional vocal cords and a daily news roundup

Jennifer Long explains how scientists have engineered human vocal cords; Catherine Matacic talks about vanquishing a deadly amphibian fungus, pigeons that spot cancer, and more. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Jaime Bosch MNCN-CSIC]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151120.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Lauren Sallan discusses the consequences of a mass extinction event 359 million years ago on vertebrate body size; David Grimm talks about grandma's immune system, gambling on studies, and killer genes. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Robert Nicholls]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151113.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

Bruce Jakosky discusses where Mars' once-thick, CO2-ish atmosphere went and the first data from the MAVEN mission to study the Red Planet; David Grimm talks about worm allergies, fake fingerprints, and toilets for all. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NASA]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151106.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

The origins of biodiversity in the Amazon and a daily news roundup

Lizzie Wade discusses whether the amazing biodiversity of the Amazon Basin was the result of massive flooding, or the uplift of the Andes mountain range. David Grimm talks about microbes aboard the International Space Station, the fate of juvenile giant ground sloths during the Pleistocene, and singing classes as social glue. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: ©Jason Houston]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_151030.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT