Science Magazine Podcast (science)
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic.

 

Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.

 

 

[Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160722_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

What do we know about humanity-ending catastrophes? Julia Rosen talks with Sarah Crespi about various doomsday scenarios and what science can do to save us.

Alex Kacelnik talks about getting ducklings to recognize “same” and “different”—a striking finding that reveals conceptual thinking in very early life.

 Read the related research.

[Image: Antone Martinho/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160715.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on how once we lose cartilage it’s gone forever, genetically engineering a supersniffing mouse, and building an artificial animal from silicon and heart cells, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 As we learn more and more about exoplanets, we find we know less and less about what were thought of as the basics: why planets are where they are in relation to their stars and how they formed. Kevin Wagner joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the latest unexpected exoplanet—a young jovian planet in a three-star system.

 [Image: Hellerhoff/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0;Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160708.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on how plants know when to take risks, confirmation that the ozone layer is on the mend, and genes that come alive after death, with Online News Editor David Grimm.

 

Science news writer Jon Cohen talks with Julia Rosen about South Africa’s bid to end AIDS.

 

[Image: J.Seita/Flickr/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160701.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to how mosquito spit helps make us sick, mother bears protect their young with human shields, and blind cave fish could teach us a thing or two about psychiatric disease, with online news editor Catherine Matacic.

 

Marcia McNutt looks back on her time as Science’s editor-in-chief, her many natural disaster–related editorials, and looks forward to her next stint as president of the National Academy of Sciences, with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Siegfried Klaus/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160624.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on the first mirror image molecule spotted in outer space, looking at the role of touch in the development of autism, and grafting on lab-built bones, with online news editor David Grimm.

 

Karen Ersche talks about why cocaine addiction is so hard to treat and what we can learn by bringing addicted subjects into the lab with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Science/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160617.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.

 

Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: 160610_SciencePodcast.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Listen to stories on new evidence for double dog domestication, what traces of mercury in coral can tell us about local wars, and an update to a classic adaptation story, with online news editor David Grimm.

 

Brendan Colón talks about a bionic leaf system that captures light and carbon and converts it to several different types of fuels with host Sarah Crespi.

 

[Image: Andy Phillips/Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160603.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on underground rings built by Neandertals, worldwide increases in cephalopods and a controversial hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Glen Weyl joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss academics’ role in rising markets that depend on data and networks of people. We’re lucky to live in the age of the match—need a ride, a song, a husband? There’s an app that can match your needs to the object of your desire, with some margin of error. But much of this innovation is happening in the private sector—what is academia doing to contribute?

 

[Music: Jeffrey Cook; Image: Etienne Fabre / SSAC]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160527.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on finding clues to giraffes’ height in their genomes, evidence that humans are still evolving from massive genome projects, and studies that infect humans with diseases on purpose.

 Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss an intense study of slum-dwelling rats.

[Image: Mauricio Susin]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_160520.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT