Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Micro-organisms live inside everything from the human gut to coral—but where do they come from? Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Staff Writer Elizabeth Pennisi about the first comprehensive survey of microbes in Hawaii’s Waimea Valley, which revealed that plants and animals get their unique microbiomes from organisms below them in the food chain or the wider environment.

 

Going global, Meagan then speaks with Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about a project that aggregated the expertise of more than 250 archaeologists to map human land use over the past 10,000 years. This detailed map will help fine-tune climate models.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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[Image: Chris Couderc/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 

  

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Authors: Meagan Cantwell; Elizabeth Pennisi

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190830.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

Changing the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline from 1-800-273- 8255 (TALK) to a three-digit number could save lives—especially when coupled with other strategies. Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Greg Miller, a science journalist based in Portland, Oregon, about three effective methods to prevent suicides—crisis hotlines, standardizing mental health care, and restricting lethal means. Greg’s feature is part of a larger package in Science exploring paths out of darkness.

 

With more solutions this week, host Sarah Crespi speaks with A. R. Siders, a social scientist at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, about her policy forum on the need for “managed climate retreat”—strategically moving people and property away from high-risk flood and fire zones. Integrating relocation into a larger strategy could maximize its benefits, supporting equality and economic development along the way.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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[Image: Scott Woods-Fehr/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] 

 

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Authors: Meagan Cantwell; Greg Miller; Sarah Crespi

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190823.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

Researchers, regulators, and the chicken industry are all united in their search for a way to make eggs more ethical by stopping culling—the killing of male chicks born to laying hens. Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel talks with host Sarah Crespi about the many approaches being tried to [determine the sex of chicken embryos before they hatch-linkTK], from robots with lasers, to MRIs, to AI, to gene editing with CRISPR.

 

Also this week, Sarah talks with Melanie Bergmann, a marine biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, about finding microplastic particles in snow all the way up at the Fram Strait, between Greenland and the Svalbarg archipelago in Norway.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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[Image: fruchtzwerg’s world/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Gretchen Vogel

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190816.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

In recent months, telecommunications companies in the United States have purchased a new part of the spectrum for use in 5G cellphone networks. Weather forecasters are concerned that these powerful signals could swamp out weaker signals from water vapor—which are in a nearby band and important for weather prediction. Freelance science writer Gabriel Popkin joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the possible impact of cellphone signals on weather forecasting and some suggested regulations.

 

In other weather news this week, Sarah talks with Pengfei Yu, a professor at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China, about his group’s work using a huge smoke plume from the 2017 wildfires in western Canada as a model for smoke from nuclear bombs. They found the wildfire smoke lofted itself 23 kilometers into the stratosphere, spread across the Northern Hemisphere, and took 8 months to dissipate, which line up with models of nuclear winter and suggests these fires can help predict the results of a nuclear war.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Gabriel Popkin

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190809.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

After two mysterious earthquake swarms occurred under the Sea of Galilee, researchers found a relationship between these small quakes and the excessive extraction of groundwater. Science journalist Michael Price talks with host Sarah Crespi about making this connection and what it means for water-deprived fault areas like the Sea of Galilee and the state of California.

 

Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Adrian Baez-Ortega from the University of Cambridge’s Transmissible Cancer Group about the genome of a canine venereal cancer that has been leaping from dog to dog for about 8000 years. By comparing the genomes of this cancer from dogs around the globe, the researchers were able to learn more about its origins and spread around the world. They also discuss how such a long-lived cancer might help them better understand and treat human cancers.

 

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

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Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Carl Campbell/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Michael Price

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190802.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EST

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