Science Magazine Podcast
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

On this week’s show, senior news correspondent Jeffrey Mervis talks with host Sarah Crespi about a stalled Facebook plan to release user data to social scientists who want to study the site’s role in elections.

Sarah also talks with Jennifer Gruhn, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Copenhagen Center for Chromosome Stability, about counting chromosomes in human egg cells. It turns out that cell division errors that cause too many or too few chromosomes to remain in the egg may shape human fertility over our reproductive lives.

Finally, in this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford talks with Daniel Navon about his book Mobilizing Mutations: Human Genetics in the Age of Patient Advocacy. Visit the books blog for more author interviews: Books et al.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; The Tangled Tree by David Quammen

 

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[Image: Jennifer Gruhn; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190927.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

On this week’s show, science journalist Josh Sokol talks about a global cooling event sparked by space dust that lead to a [huge shift in animal and plant diversity 466 million years ago-linkTK.] (Read the related research article in Science Advances.)

And I talk with Kenneth Rosenberg, an applied conservation scientist at Cornell University, about steep declines in bird abundance in the United States and Canada. His team estimates about 3 billion birds have gone missing since the 1970s.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; KiwiCo.com

 

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About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Public domain; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Josh Sokol

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190920.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

In La Rinconada, Peru, a town 5100 meters up in the Peruvian Andes, residents get by breathing air with 50% less oxygen than at sea level. International News Editor Martin Enserink [visited the site with researchers studying chronic mountain sickness-linkTK]—when the body makes excess red blood cells in an effort to cope with oxygen deprivation—in these extreme conditions. Martin talks with host Sarah Crespi about how understanding why this illness occurs in some people and not others could help the residents of La Rinconada and the 140 million people worldwide living above 2500 meters. Read all the research and news in the mountain special issue.

Sarah also talks with Annika Stephanie Reinhold about her work at the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience in Berlin training rats to play hide and seek. Surprisingly, rats learned the game easily and were even able to switch roles—sometimes playing as the seeker, other times the hider. Annika talks with Sarah about why studying play behavior in animals is important for understanding the connections between play and learning in both rats and humans.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; Kroger’s Zero Hunger, Zero Waste campaign

 

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About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Tambako The Jaguar/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

Authors: Sarah Crespi; Martin Enserink

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190913.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

This week’s show starts with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade, who spent 12 days with archaeologists [searching for a lost Maya city-linkTK] in the Chiapas wilderness in Mexico. She talks with host Sarah Crespi about how you lose a city—and how you might go about finding one.

And Sarah talks with Christophe Coupé, an associate professor in the department of linguistics at the University of Hong Kong in China, about the information density of different languages. His work, published this week in Science Advances, suggests very different languages—from Chinese to Japanese to English and French—are all equally efficient at conveying information.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

 

Ads on this week’s show: Kroger’s Zero Hunger, Zero Waste campaign; KiwiCo

 

Listen to previous podcasts.

 

About the Science Podcast

 

[Image: Lizzie Wade/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

 

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Authors: Sarah Crespi; Lizzie Wade

Direct download: SciencePodcast_190906.mp3
Category:Science -- posted at: 1:59pm EDT

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